0

If you are a coffee lover you should be a Hubber!

- Post, comment and share coffee information with fellow hubbers


-Learn about coffee straight from the origin through articles, videos and infographics from our origin library


- Experience and discover Colombian Coffee with our special guests origin journeys


- Participate in the activities that the Colombian Coffee Hub have for its members


Join us!!

A valid e-mail address. All e-mails from the system will be sent to this address. The e-mail address is not made public and will only be used if you wish to receive a new password or wish to receive certain news or notifications by e-mail.
Provide a password for the new account in both fields.

Please rank these in order of importance

 

User login

Forgot your password
Enter your e-mail address. You'll be sent a new password immediately.
Made possible by Cafe de Colombia

Colombian Coffee Hub

Coffee stories from the source.
Learn more about your passion's origin.

The Colombian Coffee Hub brings fresh origin information for you to build your knowledge on different coffee topics from seed to cup. The FNC, a team of agronomical engineers, scientists and coffee farmers will be in charge of getting this information through to you.

Some of this information will be open to the general public keen on the subject. By signing up, you get the "HUBBER" status, which gives you access to more privileged in-depth information.

Just for hubbers

User login

Sign Up Forgot your password
Enter your e-mail address. You'll be sent a new password immediately.

01. Colombian coffees – different profiles, different regions

sites/default/files/12942.jpg


Quality and diversity are two closely linked elements of Colombian coffee. This country, which exclusively produces mild Arabica coffee, has many types of soil, terrain and climates provided by the three Andean mountain ranges that cut across the country from south to north, enabling Colombia to offer coffee connoisseurs a very diverse range of sensory profiles.

Coffee growing in Colombia covers all of the country’s mountainous areas, at different altitudes, that range from approximately 1,100 meters in the north of the country to up to 2,300 meters in the highest areas in the south. This is a high altitude crop, frequently grown on very steep slopes, by over 500,000 farmers whose plantations added up to 914,000 hectares at the end of 2010. Farming on plots which barely average 1.6 hectares each makes growing coffee in Colombia a predominantly family business that, after many decades, has enabled the consolidation of a coffee culture linked to traditional and manual processes that maximize crop…

02. Coffea arabica: origin distribution and evolution

sites/default/files/1_0.jpg


The Coffea genus belongs to the Rubiaceae family, which has over 500 different genus and over 6,000 species. The majority of these are either trees or bushes. Taxonomically, the plants classified under the Coffea genus are characterized by a cleft in the ventral part of their seeds (sutura coffeanum). This genus varies from small bushes up to trees that grow over 10 meters (3x feet) tall; its leaves are simple, opposite; its stipules vary as much in size as in shape; its flowers are hermaphrodites, white and tubular; and its fruits consist of drupes of different shapes, colors and sizes; each fruit normally contains two seeds.

Linneo (1737) classified the plant as a new genus, Coffea, with only one known species at the time, C. arabica. Today 103 species have been identified. All native from Africa and Madagascar (including the Comoro Islands) Nonetheless, only two are responsible for 99% of the genus's global commerce: Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora.

The Coffea canephora…

03. Fresh coffee all year round

sites/default/files/flo1.jpg


 The harvest seasons are related to the seasonality in which the coffee trees blossom in the Tropic. In the case of Arabica coffee, the harvest occurs between 210 and 224 days after the trees have bloomed. The blossoms are induced when the trees have faced the absence of rain for a few weeks.
This is known by professionals as hydric stress and when it is followed by sustained rainfall the trees’ hormones react in such a way that the buds flower. In this way, tropical or subtropical countries that have dry and wet periods (dry and rainy seasons) during the year, tend to have concentrated flowering seasons and, consequently, their harvest is concentrated 8 months after the blossom takes place.

When blossoms are concentrated it usually leads to the concentration of the harvest season in a short span, which favors harvesting practices by permitting the use of semi-sophisticated equipment to perform the task of collecting the coffee cherries.

However, the equipment used to…

04. Coffee regions in Colombia

sites/default/files/reg1.jpg


Coffee regions in Colombia have been divided in three big zones: Northern, Central and Southern.

All these regions have different climatic, topographic and cultural marked differences which give each of the coffees produced a differentiating taste in cup. Here´s what you will find depending on the region.

There's a region for every taste.

05. CENICAFÉ

sites/default/files/sugerencia-_01327_cenicafeu.jpg


Cenicafé is Colombia’s National Coffee Research Center, created in 1938 as part of the Colombian Coffee Growers Federation (FNC) to achieve its mission of supporting coffee growers through competitive, sustainable and applicable technologies and knowledge to improve coffee production.

Cenicafé is the premiere center of its kind in the world. It hosts 67 full time researchers, 44 of which hold post graduate degrees in variety of disciplines, including Phd and Post doctorate degrees. It also has ongoing agreements with a number of academic institutions in the US and Europe, including of course Colombia.

The Center has developed expertise in a number of areas of the coffee growing business, including genetic studies in order to develop new varieties, biodiversity and coffee growing, post harvesting technologies, pests and diseases, environmental conservation and carbon footprint and denomination of origin.

Its focus has always been to maintain the premium quality of Colombian Coffee for the benefit of its growers and consumers. The commitment of Cenicafé is to…

06. Coffee Production Processes in Colombia

sites/default/files/pro1.jpg


Production processes are different in every part of the world.

On the following info-graphic you will see in detail what are the production processes in Colombia.

Keep up to date to find more detailed information on each process.

07. Arabica varieties: Towards the best quality On cup

sites/default/files/grafica_cabezote-varieties-.jpg


Colombia only grows coffee from the C. arabica species.

You can see a description of the varieties that are grown in Colombian soils in the following info-graphic.

08. A Vital Step for Quality Coffee: Removing the Mucilage

sites/default/files/imagen_13.png


In the wet mill or beneficio process that is used mostly in countries that grow mild Arabica coffee, the step that comes immediately after removing the pulp from coffee beans is the mucilage removal. The mucilage is a thin, jellylike layer that recovers the bean, composed mostly of water and sugars. The process of removing it is mostly done by fermentation.

Traditionally, fermentation must take place in large tubs with round borders, right after the pulp has been removed, and it takes from 12 to 18 hours for the microorganisms in the mucilage to decompose it. Afterwards, the bean must be washed to fully remove the sugars from the bean. Otherwise the cup quality will end up being affected. There are some variables that can accelerate or decrease the time needed for fermentation. A temperature rise, for example, accelerates the breaking of the enzymes. The water used is also important as it dilutes the sugars in the mucilage. However, to apply…

09. Purchase guarantee for coffee growers

sites/default/files/imagen_9.png


Cooperatives for coffee producers in Colombia
 
One of the most important issues discussed around coffee commercialization is what percentage of the market price is actually translated to the grower. The gap between buying and selling price can be as high as 22% according to the International coffee Organization  An average coffee farmer in Colombia may produce say 20 bags of 60 kilos (1,200 kg) of green coffee per year. Of course, having fresh coffee all year round implies that all thees bags are not produced at the same time. In fact, the average transaction made in a Colombian coffee cooperative is of 180 kg of parchment coffee (equivalent to around 135kg of green coffee).

Since coffee growers grow their coffee in their farms, not in local towns, they have to pay for transportation to bring the coffee they wish to sell from their farm to the market. Given the size of the actual transaction, this costs can be a substantial share of…

10. Coffee Genomics in Colombia

sites/default/files/imagen_9_0.png


The coffee leaf rust (CLR) is the one of  the most important enemies of coffee growers. This fungus can wipe out plantations and bring growers to abject poverty in the same way it did to the Dutch run coffee plantations of Ceylan in the 19th century. This fungus has the potential to substantially  reduce the trees production and in occasions kills the trees. Controlling it is key for the sustainability of coffee plantations and coffee growers families so that a “Ceylan scenario” is avoided. Thus the plant breeding efforts in several countries to generate rust resistant varieties and hybrids.

This is why rust resistant genes for C. Arabica coffees are so valued. Fortunately, an exceptional natural occurrence took place at the beginning of the 20th century in Timor island. A natural and exceptional pollination took place between a C. Arabica and a Robusta plants, and the resulting 44 chromosome hybrid became part of the C. Arabica world with one outstanding feature:…

11. Know the 14 possible coffee defects

sites/default/files/preview14defectos_0.jpg


This document describes the different defects found on green beans as well as its incidence on roasted beans and its cup, and allows the reader to properly identify them.

We invite you to learn, to identify and to preserve the quality of Colombian coffee and by doing so, to contribute to maintain the good image of Colombia´s main agro-product: our Coffee.
 

 



 

12. Genetic Improvement Program

Alvaro Gaitán is a Colombian Microbiologist who has a PHD in plant pathology and is the head of the Coffee Diseases Study group in the National Coffee Reasearch Center (Cenicafé).
He introduces us to the Genetic Improvement program which aims to to ensure productivity and quality in Colombian Coffees.
The improved varieties developed by Cenicafé have a durable resistance against coffee rust, adapt to all Colombian climates and have bigger beans. Watch our video to learn more about this subject.

13. Rust Control, Quality and Sustainability

sites/default/files/img_8786_0.jpg


Rust Control, Quality and Sustainability
Huver Posada - PhD

Various articles shared in this site, written and reviewed by FNC’s scientists, have illustrated a number of topics related to new variety development. We now know, thanks to modern techniques, the origin of the Coffea arabica species, the reduced genetic variability of commercially produced Arabica varieties, and the fact that quality is a trait that derives from the interaction of a given plant (i.e. its genetic composition) the environment where it grows, and the practices (harvesting and post harvesting) applied to such trees.
As we have explained in previous articles, the development of the Castillo variety was by no means a simple process. First, this is a composed variety (that is, a mixture of seeds collected from different lines at F5 generation lines), with particular lines that adapt to different regional environments within Colombia. Second, it is obtained from a cross between the Caturra variety and the Timor Hybrid, and using the line…

14. BECOLSUB


Cenicafé devised this equipement for the transformation of the coffee cherry into parchment coffee. It includes the process of depulping without water, demucilage, washing and cleaning of parchment coffee, as well as mucilage mixture with the pulp using a depulping machine, a demucilager and an endless screw conveyor.

15. Castillo Coffee Varieties

sites/default/files/genetic_envpreview.jpg

Castillo is a crossed variety which is obtained from a mixture of seeds of two different breeding lines. It's characterized for its genes which make it resistant to leaf rust. Developed by Cenicafé in 2005, the variety is named Castillo as a tribute to Cenicafé researcher, Jaime Castillo Zapata (1928- 2001), a dedicated breeder of coffee. Take a look at this infographic.

16. Domestic reference price

This daily exercise supports the purchase guarantee policy established by the Colombian Coffee Growers Federation (FNC) that guarantees to coffee growers the highest possible price for their product.
One of the FNC policies that seeks to assure that the greatest possible proportion of the international price of coffee indeed is transferred to the producers, is the daily publication of the reference price for the 125 kilogram weight load (two sacks) of dry parchment coffee. This involves the need to communicate the domestic price so growers can have up to date knowledge of market prices which requires to consult, on a daily basis, the evolution of the different variables that are used to calculate domestic prices based on: rate of exchange, Colombian coffee premiums, milling and transportation costs and the evolution of the price in the New York coffee exchange for mild arabicas.
This strategy helps to improve the negotiation leverage of small coffee growers. However to make it effective, the…

17. Coffee Production Process

Follow the coffee Production Process through the hands of a coffee grower from origin.

18. Understanding El Niño y La Niña phenomenon

sites/default/files/1_03.jpg

Learn about the climatic conditions and the effects of El Niño (Lower rainfall and excessive sunlight) and La Niña (Excessive rainfall) phenomenons on the coffee plant's health and development.

19. Postharvest

In Colombia, we consider the postharvest process as one of the most important steps of the coffee production. We use to remove the mucilage to give our coffee a clean flavor and to get to taste different profiles when we drink it. Watch the video and learn the process step by step.

20. Biological Control of the Coffee Berry Borer through the Beauveria bassiana Fungus

The Beauveria Bassiana, an entomopathogen fungus and potential mycopesticide for the efficient control of the Coffee Berry Borer has been an essential part of the Integrated Pest Management Strategy in Colombia.

21. Coffee Diseases

Cenicafé has been working with integrated pest and coffee diseases management through an ecologically-oriented methodology, using cultural, biological and chemical control techniques focusing on the quality of the bean.

22. Coffee Production Systems

In Colombia there are two main coffee production systems that have been used efficently for the production of our quality coffee. These systems have particular features that take into account geographic and environment conditions.

23. Coffee Times

¿Did you ever think about the time it takes to grow the beans you are using to make that cup of coffee?

24. Coffee Commercialization Flow

From the coffee grower to the final destination, the Colombian Coffee Commercialization Flow is supported by an organized infrastructure that buys coffee, sorts it and checks its quality and then exports it. Learn about this flow with this new infographic.

25. Denomination of Origin

The Cafe de Colombia Denomination of Origin represents and proves the connection between coffee quality, tradition and the territory where it is produced. Consequently, clients and consumers know that these characteristics they are paying a higher proce for are guaranteed.

26. Shade Grown Coffee

Using shade for growing coffee is a farming method that it is used to produce coffee in areas where extreme temperatures and soils with low organic materials would not allow to otherwise. Shade provides a suitable microclimate that protects coffee trees form high temperatures, help preserve surface soil humidity and ensures flowering and productivity.

27. Cupping for Quality

In order to determine the quality and cup profile for coffee, certain steps must be made when cupping. This is how coffee is cupped for quality in Colombia.

28. The Colombian Coffee Process

Colombia has particular growing conditions due to its geography, climate conditions and human proceses. Its coffee production chain turn Colombia´s origin into a source of uniqueness.

29. A quick overview of Colombian Coffee

Colombian coffee is carefully grown and processed over 20 departments between different altitudes to obtain an outstanding quality in cup with a distinguished flavor and aroma.

30. Temperature a key factor for growing colombian coffee


Average temperatures oscillating between 21 and 18.8 degrees Celsius, typical of Colombian mountainsides, are ideal for growing Arabica coffee.
Although the average temperature at which coffee is grown depends almost directly on altitude (height above sea level), other factors such as micro-climates, winds and distance from the equator may affect temperature variation.
The closer a coffee plantation is to the equator, the more perpendicular sunlight it receives for a longer period of time. This happens in the department of Nariño where it is possible for coffee to grow at higher altitudes.
At higher altitudes coffee tends to have more sweetness and acidity because of the drastic temperature variations between day and night.

Attributes such as aroma, body, acidity, sweetness, cleanness of cup, flavor, and balance define what we call a good coffee´s quality.
Besides climate, soil, and topography variables, quality is the result of a multiplicity of human related tasks and agricultural practices during coffee growing, harvesting and post-harvesting processes.
Therefore, it’s important to understand the…

31. Location, altitude and geographic conditions of our coffee regions

The varierty of altitudes and unique soils favor the growth of high quality crops. Learn more about location, altitud and geographic conditions of Colombian Coffee Regions in this infographic.

32. Fermentation: An essential variable for coffee quality.

Fermentation is the transformation of substances through enzymes into other substances, it is used every day in products such as alcoholic drinks (wines, beers), the pharmaceutical industry (penicillin and cortisone), plastics (without having to use raw material derived from petroleum). In coffee it is a key process to bring out its atributes.

33. Colombian Coffee and Foodpairing

Do you know how to enjoy even more a good cup of Colombian coffee? Well, drinking a cup of coffee by itself it’s a pleasure but there is a way to make it a whole new experience. We’ve partner up with Foodpairing®: “a source of inspiration that allows chefs, bartenders, and others in the food industry to create new combinations of ingredients for dishes or drinks” to discover which ingredients combine better with Colombian Coffees to highlight the wide array of flavors in them
To give you some ideas of how is done, we’ve created a Foodpairing® series that can help you explore Colombian Coffees in a whole different level.
Thinking about using Huila coffee in your recipes or preparations? Don’t miss this amazing video and infographic to get you started on pairing the perfect ingredients for your coffee.
For more information on Foodpairing with Colombian Coffees, please visit www.foodpairing.com

34. Colombian Coffee and Foodpairing Video

Do you know how to enjoy even more a good cup of Colombian coffee? Well, drinking a cup of coffee by itself it’s a pleasure but there is a way to make it a whole new experience. We’ve partner up with Foodpairing®: “a source of inspiration that allows chefs, bartenders, and others in the food industry to create new combinations of ingredients for dishes or drinks” to discover which ingredients combine better with Colombian Coffees to highlight the wide array of flavors in them
To give you some ideas of how is done, we’ve created a Foodpairing® series that can help you explore Colombian Coffees in a whole different level.
Thinking about using Huila coffee in your recipes or preparations? Don’t miss this amazing video and infographic to get you started on pairing the perfect ingredients for your coffee.
For more information on Foodpairing with Colombian Coffees, please visit www.foodpairing.com

35. Foodpairing Sierra Nevada

Foodpairing inspiration with Café de Colombia from Sierra Nevada.

36. Foodpairing Sierra Nevada

Foodpairing inspiration with Café de Colombia from Sierra Nevada.